Tag: book suggestions

Ten Christmastime Romances to Read This Year

Ten Christmastime Romances to Read This Year

You know the drill – Top Ten Tuesday is brought to us by the lovely ThatArtsyReaderGirl.

This week is a freebie, so naturally I had to go with 10 Romances to read around Christmas. Not that you’ll have time to, what with the movie watching, cooking baking, gingerbread house decorating, present wrapping, and so on and so forth. But if you do manage to sneak a book in, and you enjoy a good seasonal romance, you might want to add these to your list. I naturally went for 5 Regency romances in a nod to my reading streak along with 5 contemporary ones. A warning: I haven’t read any of these (a common theme for my Top Ten Tuesday lists), so read at your own risk.

  • The Earl’s Christmas Bride by Ella Quinn
    • This is something like 7th or 7.5 in a series, but I don’t think it’s a series in which you need to read all the others in order to enjoy it. A lady wants to go travel around Europe and a “happy bachelor” is determined to marry her…and take her to Europe (?). It sounds cute and fun, like a Christmas romance should be.
  • The Holly and the Ivy by Elisabeth Fairchild
    • The blurb contains the words “thorny duke” and “scandalous misunderstanding”, and the book has the man-who-hates-Christmas and woman-who-loves-it storyline. Honestly, what else could you ask for?
  • The Great Christmas Candy Caper by Karen Hall
    • There’s Christmas, candy, and a caper. I don’t know what else to tell you in order to sell you on this book. It’s really a short story (less than 100 pages), but has it’s own Goodreads page, so if you’re looking to pad your numbers this December, it’s an option. It’s also only $1.99 on Amazon. I’m talking to myself here. 🙂
  • A Bride for Christmas by Aileen Fish
    • Another novella – this one only 63 pages – and selling for a grand total of $0.00, this still managed to catch my attention. Mainly because the guy enlists his niblings in winning over the lady, to be honest. I enjoy books with kids, and since he has to “slay her dragons”, the addition of wee ones helping him seems right. Also – another one to pad the ol’ Goodreads Reading Challenge numbers.
  • The Lady’s Guide to Mistletoe and Mayhem by Emmanuelle de Maupassant
    • A woman fleeing from a marriage by pretending to be an etiquette teacher, a Texan who is also a Scottish heir, a curse, mysterious deaths, a Scottish setting, and Christmas? Say no more. Add it to the list.
  • Snowed in at Harper’s Inn by Catelyn Meadows
    • Apparently one in a series of clean Christmas romances written by a bunch of different authors (the next one is part of this series as well), this involves a “what if things were different” magical plot device, a cute lil Inn, a sudden breakup, and a “we’ve been friends forever, but maybe we should be in love” storyline. Honestly, it sounds like a Hallmark movie.
  • Snowed in at the Archive by Ellie Thornton
    • I think I like books with snow on the cover because I haven’t seen snow in real life in 5(?) years and I’ve always dreamed of a snowy winter/Christmas. That’s what I get for living in the South, I guess. Anyway, there’s an archive involved so I don’t know what else to say – of course I’m going to want to pick up a book set in an archive while there’s snow everywhere.
  • In a Holidaze by Christina Lauren
    • The heroine here is stuck in a Groundhog Day-esque time loop for at least *some* of the book, and the reviews are quite split on if it works or not. Reading the blurb makes me think it may be cute, but apparently the romance is also hit or miss. I’m so divided on this one. I like the ideas here – time loops, love with the boy you’ve known forever, leaving traditions behind (unwillingly), but the reviews are meh at best. But who knows, it could be my favorite book.
  • Fool Me Twice at Christmas by Camilla Isley
    • Once upon a time, Shane and I broke up over the holidays – and yet I still made him have Thanksgiving (I think it was Thanksgiving) dinner with my parents as if we hadn’t. A decade later, we’re married, so I connect with the idea of “we broke up, but let’s not tell our parents” and then ending up back in a relationship. The book has the added perk of them becoming “accidentally engaged” which is a thing that didn’t happen to me. It’s the first in a series called Christmas Romantic Comedy so I also know it’s my kind of vibe.
  • Simply Irresistible by Jill Shalvis
    • The first in a 17 book/novella series, it starts with a major life upheaval and claiming an inheritance – both things I really like. I’ve always heard Jill Shalvis is an excellent writer, and I’m tempted to pick up a copy for that reason alone. Also, who doesn’t love a “fall in love with the handyman” story?

Writing this post has made me want to go out and get several of these and spend some evenings reading. I do not need more ebooks. I do not need more ebooks. I do not need more ebooks.

It is Christmas, though.

-S

Series I’d Like to Start/Reread/Finish

Series I’d Like to Start/Reread/Finish

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday from That Artsy Reader Girl is one that I really enjoyed, because I am notorious for starting a series and then taking for-ev-er to finish them. Let me know if you’ve read any of these or have a suggestion!

Pern – Anne McCaffrey

Reread

Anne McCaffrey has always been my favorite author, from when I was a child, to now. She writes strong female characters, and they’re everywhere. Her books are like comfort food for me, and I think rereading all the Pern books is a great exercise for me right now. And there are dragons.

The Wheel of Time – Robert Jordan

Start

I have read 0 of these, but Shane has read all of them, and bought them on Kindle. It’s a classic series that I’ve heard great (and not-so-great) things about and I’m interested in seeing what the hype is about. I might put this off until I forget the tv show, though.

Riftwar Saga – Raymond E. Feist

Reread

I grew up reading Raymond E. Feist, and a few years back I decided I wanted to read through the whole thing again. I now own all 30+ of them, and have only re-read 10ish, so this is definitely at the top of my list of series to read. I won’t lie, some of them are….problematic, but overall, they’re classic Fantasy novels and bring back my childhood.

Smythe-Smith Quartet/Rokesbys/Lady Whistledown – Julia Quinn (Technically 3 series)

Start

I really enjoyed the Bridgerton books (and the show, to be fair), so I’m definitely interested in reading more of her books. I also just enjoy the time period. Technically, this encompasses 3 series, but none of them are terribly long, and they’re such quick reads, I combined them all. I really enjoy Regency romances, apparently. Who knew?

Countess of Harleigh Mystery – Dianne Freeman

Start

I also love historical mysteries with some romance, so when I saw this, I knew I wanted to read it. They’re cute and fun, the stakes are never terribly high and the romance is generally adorable, and it’s just comfortable. I guess going into the holiday season, I’m thinking of comfiness, and not hard hitting books that make me think.

Maisie Dobbs – Jacqueline Winspear

Start

Another historical mystery series! Apparently this one might be too cutesy, but I’m willing to find that out for myself. It’s also in my favorite time period – between 1910 and the beginning of WWII. A lot of people have recommended this series to me, so I’m looking forward to reading it.

Somershill Manor – S.D. Sykes

Start

Oh look! Another historical mystery series! A huge departure from the ones above, though. It’s set way earlier – 1300s – and with a much different protagonist – a monk turned Lord of the Manor. There’s also an added quirk is that the Plague has ravaged the land, so that’s fun. I haven’t read much in this time period, so I’m not sure how “true to life” it is – and I’m not sure I really care. I don’t read fiction as truth.

Krewe of Hunters – Heather Graham

Finish

Another series of over 30 books, of which I have read around 10. I don’t know why I love these books, but I sure do – paranormal mystery solving with romance? I’m in. I’m also curious as to how she finds all the people who fall in love.

First Colony – Ken Lozito

Start

Another deep love of mine is science fiction set in spaceships. Ever since I was a kid, I have loved to read about people voyaging across the stars and I’ve always been bummed that there aren’t that many in this genre, and those that are often poorly written. YA has some good ones, but adult fiction is lacking. This has been changing, and I’m hoping this one is one that I can start recommending.

Hell Divers – Nicholas Sansbury Smith

Finish

This is a wild ride, y’all. Seriously, this series is all over the place and I don’t even know how to explain it. It’s a dystopian military-ish found family, and there are cannibals. I’ve listened to 7 of the 9 currently published, with the 8th & 9th waiting for me in Audible. I won’t lie – part of the draw is that R.C. Bray is the narrator. I love R.C. Bray.

10 Witchy Books to Read This Month

It’s spooky season, which means it’s time to read all the spooky books. I don’t have much time to read this month (yay new job & also a horror movie challenge that was not thought through enough), but if I *did*, these are the witchy books I’d read this month.


Payback’s a Witch – Lana Harper

I’m about halfway through this book, and while it’s not what I’d normally pick up, I’m very much enjoying it. The feeling of returning to a place you don’t feel like you belong, the idea that people from back in middle/high school are fully fleshed out adults now – I relate to that. The witchy elements are really fun and the rivalry is enjoyable. It’s definitely trending to be one of my favorite books of 2022, but I’ll reserve judgement until the end.

The Witch of Willow Hall – Hester Fox

I love historical fiction, especially if it’s gothic, and this one promises to be that – set in the 1800s in Mass. One of the reviews says it has an “underlining of menace” and you can sign me up for that. It seems to be more of a subtle witch vibe than the previous book, so I think it’s more in line with what I would normally read.

The Mercies – Kiran Millwood Hargrave

Speaking of historical fiction – this one goes way further back to the 1600s in Norway. I have read very few books set in Norway, much less that take place in that century, so that’s enough to add it to my TBR list. I guess you could say it’s not a witchy book, it’s a witch trial book, but I’m going to count it, since witch trials are very much a part of the history of witches.

The Once and Future Witches – Alix E. Harrow

I’m on the fence about this one – it’s set in the late 1800s and seems to focus on women’s suffrage which normally I’d be all over, but the alliterative names feel over the top cutesy. The reviews are great though, and I do like that it’s a feminist-focused story. And there’s actual witchcraft in it. Let me know if you ever read it!

The Very Secret Society of Irregular Witches – Sangu Mandanna

This has so many elements of a story that I’ll love. There’s an absent archaeologist, a prickly librarian, children being placed into the care of what is basically a governess. And witches, obviously. Add a little romance, I’m sold.

The Ex Hex – Erin Sterling

This one is set in Georgia, and is another romance. I didn’t set out to build a list of witchy romances, but there are apparently a ton of them. There’s a talking cat, too, so you know I added it to Mount TBR. I honestly just really enjoy the idea of putting a hex on your ex and then having to help undo it. It seems like there’s a lot of room for interesting writing there.

The Raven Spell – Luanne G. Smith

I just want to put the first line of the description from Goodreads below, because it truly encapsulates why I want to read this one.

In Victorian England a witch and a detective are on the hunt for a serial killer in an enthralling novel of magic and murder.

This Poison Heart – Kalynn Bayron

I love the idea of a witch who manipulates plants/nature, and I also love surprise inheritances that lead to the main character moving into a haunted and/or ruined estate. This has both. And a centuries-old curse. It’s apparently a retelling, but I’m not sure of what from the description. I would have to guess Greek myths, though.

The Last of the Moon Girls – Barbara Davis

Another mystery/thriller/magical/romance novel. Another “I left home never to return, but then someone died and here I am again, oh and there’s a cute boy” so, yeah, I did add it to the TBR. There’s a murder mystery – though why she didn’t want to solve it while her grandmother was alive and suffering from the town’s gossip I have no idea. I guess we’ll be told eventually.

The Change – Kirsten Miller

As I reach my mid-30s, I am more and more interested in protagonists that are my age or older. And this has 3 menopausal aged women learning that they’re witches and also they try to (do?) solve a murder. A few of the reviews said it was too heavy on the man-hating, which can be kind of a downer, but depending on the story and how their individual backgrounds play into it, a feminist revenge fantasy can be fun.


So there you have it – 9 witchy books I have not read, and 1 I’m currently reading that seem like good Halloween/October reads.

If you pick any of these up, let me know! I would love to get some thoughts on them.

A note – I realized that I didn’t specify when the romances were queer. A few on here are, so in the interests of those who are looking specifically for an LGBTQ+ book: Payback’s a Witch, The Mercies, This Poison Heart, and The Once and Future Witches are tagged as queer/LGBT in Goodreads. Payback I know has several bi characters and the main relationship is f/f.

-S

22 Books I Want to Read in 22

The final 22 list of the year – 22 Books I Want to Read. I have the worst track record with making a TBR pile, but I will always hold out hope that I’ll complete one. And I’ve already read one of them, so that’s a great sign!

My Favorite Books From the Last 6 Months

I’ve actually been reading this year (not enough for my Goodreads challenge, but that’s beside the point), so I wanted to look at my favorite books from the first 6 months of 2020.

Non-Fiction

  • If You Tell: A True Story of Murder, Family Secrets, and the Unbreakable Bond of Sisterhood by Gregg Olsen
    • This book is a nightmare in written form. The fact that it’s non-fiction is a nightmare unto itself. It’s a horrible tale of child abuse, murder, and the awful compiles on top of awful. I listened to the audiobook which lessened the emotional distance between me and what was happening. It feels weird to say this was one of my ‘favorites’ but it basically blew my mind like no other so I think it deserves a space on the list.
  • Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, Her Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed by Lori Gottlieb
    • I loved this book. I bought the ebook, and I definitely plan on reading it again. I recognized myself, or people I know, in a lot of the stories she tells throughout the book. I don’t know why this was so easy to connect with when I have struggled to connect with similar books. Highly recommend.

From My Favorite Authors

  • Alone in the Wild by Kelley Armstrong
    • I’ve read all of the Rockton novels, and knew I was going to read this one as soon as I found out it was being published this year. I haven’t read any of her other books/series, but they’re on the list for sure. I really enjoy the concept behind the Rockton novels – basically a hidden town in the Northern bits of Canada for people who have something to hide from. It’s a bit of a romance series, but the mystery (read: insanity) is the big draw.
  • Silence for the Dead by Simone St. James
    • I’m a huge Simone St. James fan, and this was my second read through of this novel. I like the time period – post WWI – and the creepy atmosphere she gives most of her books. She does have 2 modern day novels, and the one I’ve read was also great and I definitely have the other one on the to be read list.

Other Fiction

  • The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah
    • This is a rough read, but it was also really satisfying to finish. It didn’t make me cry, but I definitely had some serious feelings about it. The setting is Alaska and I found it really interesting to read about life (even fictional) in rural Alaska. Definitely check it out.
  • Seveneves by Neal Stephenson
    • Shane has been bugging me to read this for literally years, and I finally did. It is a crazy roller coaster ride. It’s super depressing in parts, but it also left me with a really interesting sense of hope. I only guessed about half of the major twisty twist, which doesn’t happen often these days, so that’s a cool plus. I don’t really want to talk too much about it, so I don’t give away any spoilers. Needless to say, I’ll be reading more books that Shane recommends.

I’ve been saying “oh, I only want to read things that aren’t challenging – I don’t want to think” for a couple of years now, and this list is showing me that I really do like to challenge myself sometimes. I might need to push myself to expand my reading circle and try out some more mentally challenging reads.

In case you’re wondering, I’m 4 books behind on my 2020 reading challenge. I’m just not worried about it. 🙂

Sarah

Ten Upcoming Releases

Top Ten Tuesday is a feature currently run by That Artsy Reader Girl.

I don’t track a ton of upcoming releases, so instead of fulfilling the real prompt ‘Upcoming Releases I’m on The Fence About’, I’m going to just make a list of upcoming books I’m looking forward to. I’ll leave out the ones I listed here though. Since I’m on a book-buying ban *and* trying to read books I already own in 2019, I’ll probably only end up reading The Last Widow by Karin Slaughter. She’s an insta-buy for me, book ban or not.

  • The Invited ~ Jennifer McMahon
    • I like the look of this one – a couple flees suburbia just to build a house and end up building a haunted one. I already own, but haven’t read, her other book The Night Sister.
  • The Last Letter ~ Rebecca Yarros
    • I think this is the only romance on this list. I don’t know why but the letter in the description caught my interest.
  • The Missing Years ~ Lexie Elliott
    • Missing dad + Scottish Highlands + creepy house + possible ghosts? Might be a contender for Creepy October/Blogoween.
  • The Confessions of Frannie Langton ~ Sara Collins
    • This looks so amazing I can’t do it justice here – just go read the Goodreads description. I might have to get this from the library in 2019.
  • Never Tell (D.D. Warren #10)~ Lisa Gardner
    • I may not get to this one for awhile, but I’ve read the first 7 D.D. Warren books and once I’ve read through some of the books I already own, I’d love to read 8 through 10.
  • The Night Olivia Fell ~ Christina McDonald
    • A mother tries to figure out what happened to her daughter – a chain of events that ends with Olivia falling off a bridge while pregnant. Seems like a good mystery.
  • The Raven Tower ~ Ann Leckie
    • I’ve been looking to get more into fantasy lately so this one caught my eye immediately when I saw it on the Goodreads giveaway page. The author is apparently a great sci-fi writer so we’ll see how that translates!
  • The Victory Garden ~ Rhys Bowen
    • I love fiction set during and directly after WWI and the description of this novel seems really touching and I think it looks like a really good read.
  • The Lost History of Dreams ~ Kris Waldherr
    • I got really into Gothic historical fiction last year and the reviews for this one are so, so good. If I decide to do creepy October again this year this might be one of the books I get for that.
  • The Last Widow (Will Trent #9)~ Karin Slaughter {not pictured}
    • I cannot wait for this! It’s on the “okay to buy during No-Buy 2019” list. It’s been awhile since there was a Will Trent/Sara Linton book and I’m pumped.

Most Anticipated Releases for the First Half of 2019

  • The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides
    • I love a good mystery and this one looks like a great one. Who doesn’t want to know why a woman shoots her husband in the face and then never speaks again?
  • The Au Pair by Emma Rous
    • The comparison to VC Andrews is enough to make me want to read this one. I’ll be requesting it from the library.
  • Watcher in the Woods by Kelley Armstrong
    • Is it cheating to put a book that’s next in a series you’re reading? I really enjoy the Rockton series. I discovered it while I was packing to move and I had both audiobooks and ebooks so I could read or listen when needed.
  • The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon
    • The buzz around this one is big, and it looks like a very interesting fantasy novel. It’s also huge. I’m excited.
  • Aurora Rising by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff
    • Written by the authors of The Illuminae Files. That’s enough for me, but the description also sounds great.
  • Shadow Captain by Alastair Reynolds
    • Not going to lie, I’m eagerly anticipating this one for Shane. He loves Alastair Reynolds and he can’t wait to read this one.
  • The Similars by Rebecca Hanover
    • I need to read more YA sci-fi, because I really love it and haven’t read much of it lately.
  • The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs by Katherine Howe
    • I love Katherine Howe. I’ve read all her books, and I’m not about to stop now.
  • The Summer Country by Lauren Willig
    • I haven’t read much historical fiction set in Barbados, but I’m very interested in this mystery.
  • Unmarriageable by Soniah Kamal
    • Pride and Prejudice plus a culture I’m fairly unfamiliar with? Sign me up.

My Top Ten on My Winter TBR

Top Ten Tuesday is a feature currently run by That Artsy Reader Girl.

Top Ten Tuesday is a feature currently run by That Artsy Reader Girl.

Usually, I don’t really look at these TBR lists after making them, but I feel like this is a pretty accurate representation of what I’m going to be reading over the next couple of months. Especially Terminal World, I’ve been reading it off and on for months, and Shane (who loves it), is starting to get his feelings hurt. The rest of these fiction books are ones that I’ve been really looking forward to. 

  1. All the Weyrs of Pern ~ Anne McCaffrey 
  2. Terminal World ~ Alastair Reynolds
  3. Avalon – Mindee Arnett
  4. A Winter Flame ~ Milly Johnson
  5. The Mysterious Affair At Castaway House ~ Stephanie Lam

On the non-fiction side, I’ve been looking at figuring out this whole ‘being a super responsible adult’ thing, hence the style books, the book on writing, and the book on bullet journals. The Murder Room is just going to be a great read. 

  1. The Curated Closet ~ Anuschka Rees
  2. Classic Style: Hand it Down, Dress it Up, Wear it Out ~ Kate Schelter
  3. The Murder Room ~ Michael Capuzzo
  4. On Writing ~ Stephen King
  5. The Bullet Journal Method ~ Ryder Carroll

Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate {Review}

Memphis, 1939. Twelve-year-old Rill Foss and her four younger siblings live a magical life aboard their family’s Mississippi River shantyboat. But when their father must rush their mother to the hospital one stormy night, Rill is left in charge—until strangers arrive in force. Wrenched from all that is familiar and thrown into a Tennessee Children’s Home Society orphanage, the Foss children are assured that they will soon be returned to their parents—but they quickly realize the dark truth. At the mercy of the facility’s cruel director, Rill fights to keep her sisters and brother together in a world of danger and uncertainty.

Aiken, South Carolina, present day. Born into wealth and privilege, Avery Stafford seems to have it all: a successful career as a federal prosecutor, a handsome fiancé, and a lavish wedding on the horizon. But when Avery returns home to help her father weather a health crisis, a chance encounter leaves her with uncomfortable questions and compels her to take a journey through her family’s long-hidden history, on a path that will ultimately lead either to devastation or to redemption.

I’d say a 3.5 out of 5 stars.

I knew about Georgia Tann (thanks Unsolved Mysteries!!), but this book really drives the awfulness home. It also had tidbits that I didn’t know, so that was interesting. The only issue I had with her section was that it was unrelenting horror. Which was the point, so I guess that’s a good thing.

To be honest, it really doesn’t carry that sense of loss and pain into Rill’s adult life. A second book following her into adulthood and her search for family would be great. The book seemed to close up with a rush and left a lot to wonder about. I just really wish we had more information about everything. This is so hard to write without spoliers!

The other main character, Avery, is a bit annoying but her story is okay. I would have liked to spend more time on her search instead of her worrying about if she wants to be a politician. Also, her obsession with people knowing her last name and treating her differently made me laugh. Your daddy may be a senator but did he play football, Avery? It’s a real thing, sure, but her attitude about it struck me as funny.

This novel covers a very important (and hushed up) time in history. Joan Crawford adopted her children from Georgia Tann. People should read it, then read more about the whole shenanigan, and then give past US authorities some serious side eye.

Before We Were Yours has some weaknesses. Avery is a snoozefest and I was left dying for information about what happened when the ‘orphans’ became adults. And why did Big Trent hate his dad so much? Why is Jonah given such a weird backstory? But its strengths greatly outweigh the weaknesses. Wingate hits every awful thing that could have happened to a Tann child and I don’t think I’ll ever forget reading Rill’s story. Read it.

-Sarah-

10 Non-Fiction Books I Can’t Wait to Read

TTT-NEWTop Ten Tuesday is a feature that is currently run by That Artsy Reader Girl.

Today’s topic is a back to school freebie, so I picked 10 non-fiction books I can’t wait to read! This week’s post is going to be a little shorter than usual (I got sunburnt and was super slow to get around to everything I needed to do this weekend) – back to normal next week!

1. Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser
I grew up reading Laura Ingalls Wilder and I really want to read what life was really like at that time. I have ideas from other sources, but this will be the first read that specifically addresses her life.

2. American Passage: The History of Ellis Island by Vincent J. Cannato
Everyone should know a little bit about the history of Ellis Island and the country. My paternal forefathers came through Charleston, SC but the stories from Ellis Island are so fascinating.

3. Life in a Medieval Castle by Joseph & Frances Gies
I just really like history, especially the history of every day life.

4. Finders Keepers: A Tale of Archaeological Plunder and Obsession by Craig Childs
Archaeology and all its attendant tales are super intriguing to me – it’s what I wanted to do with my life and I’m still endlessly interested.

5. The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu and Their Race to Save the World’s Most Precious Manuscripts by Joshua Hammer
Who doesn’t like an Indiana Jones-style (less the paranormal) rescue of precious knowledge?

6. The Suspicions of Mr Whicher: A Shocking Murder and the Undoing of a Great Victorian Detective by Kate Summerscale
Since this is a list by me, there has to be a true crime book!

7. The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher
I didn’t know much about Carrie Fisher until she passed away, but the flood of stories about her after her death makes me want to read about her in her own words.

8. On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King
I’m headed to Maine again in Oct 2019 & will probably be in Bangor for a bit and have never actually read a Stephen King book sooooo I’m picking this one!

9.  How to Manage Your Home Without Losing Your Mind: Dealing with Your House’s Dirty Little Secrets by Dana K. White
I’m not what you’d call a good housekeeper and neither is Shane, so a little help would be appreciated.

10. The Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku
I love history, but I love technology and futurism so this should be a perfect read to satisfy that interest.