Tag: Reading

Ten Christmastime Romances to Read This Year

Ten Christmastime Romances to Read This Year

You know the drill – Top Ten Tuesday is brought to us by the lovely ThatArtsyReaderGirl.

This week is a freebie, so naturally I had to go with 10 Romances to read around Christmas. Not that you’ll have time to, what with the movie watching, cooking baking, gingerbread house decorating, present wrapping, and so on and so forth. But if you do manage to sneak a book in, and you enjoy a good seasonal romance, you might want to add these to your list. I naturally went for 5 Regency romances in a nod to my reading streak along with 5 contemporary ones. A warning: I haven’t read any of these (a common theme for my Top Ten Tuesday lists), so read at your own risk.

  • The Earl’s Christmas Bride by Ella Quinn
    • This is something like 7th or 7.5 in a series, but I don’t think it’s a series in which you need to read all the others in order to enjoy it. A lady wants to go travel around Europe and a “happy bachelor” is determined to marry her…and take her to Europe (?). It sounds cute and fun, like a Christmas romance should be.
  • The Holly and the Ivy by Elisabeth Fairchild
    • The blurb contains the words “thorny duke” and “scandalous misunderstanding”, and the book has the man-who-hates-Christmas and woman-who-loves-it storyline. Honestly, what else could you ask for?
  • The Great Christmas Candy Caper by Karen Hall
    • There’s Christmas, candy, and a caper. I don’t know what else to tell you in order to sell you on this book. It’s really a short story (less than 100 pages), but has it’s own Goodreads page, so if you’re looking to pad your numbers this December, it’s an option. It’s also only $1.99 on Amazon. I’m talking to myself here. 🙂
  • A Bride for Christmas by Aileen Fish
    • Another novella – this one only 63 pages – and selling for a grand total of $0.00, this still managed to catch my attention. Mainly because the guy enlists his niblings in winning over the lady, to be honest. I enjoy books with kids, and since he has to “slay her dragons”, the addition of wee ones helping him seems right. Also – another one to pad the ol’ Goodreads Reading Challenge numbers.
  • The Lady’s Guide to Mistletoe and Mayhem by Emmanuelle de Maupassant
    • A woman fleeing from a marriage by pretending to be an etiquette teacher, a Texan who is also a Scottish heir, a curse, mysterious deaths, a Scottish setting, and Christmas? Say no more. Add it to the list.
  • Snowed in at Harper’s Inn by Catelyn Meadows
    • Apparently one in a series of clean Christmas romances written by a bunch of different authors (the next one is part of this series as well), this involves a “what if things were different” magical plot device, a cute lil Inn, a sudden breakup, and a “we’ve been friends forever, but maybe we should be in love” storyline. Honestly, it sounds like a Hallmark movie.
  • Snowed in at the Archive by Ellie Thornton
    • I think I like books with snow on the cover because I haven’t seen snow in real life in 5(?) years and I’ve always dreamed of a snowy winter/Christmas. That’s what I get for living in the South, I guess. Anyway, there’s an archive involved so I don’t know what else to say – of course I’m going to want to pick up a book set in an archive while there’s snow everywhere.
  • In a Holidaze by Christina Lauren
    • The heroine here is stuck in a Groundhog Day-esque time loop for at least *some* of the book, and the reviews are quite split on if it works or not. Reading the blurb makes me think it may be cute, but apparently the romance is also hit or miss. I’m so divided on this one. I like the ideas here – time loops, love with the boy you’ve known forever, leaving traditions behind (unwillingly), but the reviews are meh at best. But who knows, it could be my favorite book.
  • Fool Me Twice at Christmas by Camilla Isley
    • Once upon a time, Shane and I broke up over the holidays – and yet I still made him have Thanksgiving (I think it was Thanksgiving) dinner with my parents as if we hadn’t. A decade later, we’re married, so I connect with the idea of “we broke up, but let’s not tell our parents” and then ending up back in a relationship. The book has the added perk of them becoming “accidentally engaged” which is a thing that didn’t happen to me. It’s the first in a series called Christmas Romantic Comedy so I also know it’s my kind of vibe.
  • Simply Irresistible by Jill Shalvis
    • The first in a 17 book/novella series, it starts with a major life upheaval and claiming an inheritance – both things I really like. I’ve always heard Jill Shalvis is an excellent writer, and I’m tempted to pick up a copy for that reason alone. Also, who doesn’t love a “fall in love with the handyman” story?

Writing this post has made me want to go out and get several of these and spend some evenings reading. I do not need more ebooks. I do not need more ebooks. I do not need more ebooks.

It is Christmas, though.

-S

Series I’d Like to Start/Reread/Finish

Series I’d Like to Start/Reread/Finish

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday from That Artsy Reader Girl is one that I really enjoyed, because I am notorious for starting a series and then taking for-ev-er to finish them. Let me know if you’ve read any of these or have a suggestion!

Pern – Anne McCaffrey

Reread

Anne McCaffrey has always been my favorite author, from when I was a child, to now. She writes strong female characters, and they’re everywhere. Her books are like comfort food for me, and I think rereading all the Pern books is a great exercise for me right now. And there are dragons.

The Wheel of Time – Robert Jordan

Start

I have read 0 of these, but Shane has read all of them, and bought them on Kindle. It’s a classic series that I’ve heard great (and not-so-great) things about and I’m interested in seeing what the hype is about. I might put this off until I forget the tv show, though.

Riftwar Saga – Raymond E. Feist

Reread

I grew up reading Raymond E. Feist, and a few years back I decided I wanted to read through the whole thing again. I now own all 30+ of them, and have only re-read 10ish, so this is definitely at the top of my list of series to read. I won’t lie, some of them are….problematic, but overall, they’re classic Fantasy novels and bring back my childhood.

Smythe-Smith Quartet/Rokesbys/Lady Whistledown – Julia Quinn (Technically 3 series)

Start

I really enjoyed the Bridgerton books (and the show, to be fair), so I’m definitely interested in reading more of her books. I also just enjoy the time period. Technically, this encompasses 3 series, but none of them are terribly long, and they’re such quick reads, I combined them all. I really enjoy Regency romances, apparently. Who knew?

Countess of Harleigh Mystery – Dianne Freeman

Start

I also love historical mysteries with some romance, so when I saw this, I knew I wanted to read it. They’re cute and fun, the stakes are never terribly high and the romance is generally adorable, and it’s just comfortable. I guess going into the holiday season, I’m thinking of comfiness, and not hard hitting books that make me think.

Maisie Dobbs – Jacqueline Winspear

Start

Another historical mystery series! Apparently this one might be too cutesy, but I’m willing to find that out for myself. It’s also in my favorite time period – between 1910 and the beginning of WWII. A lot of people have recommended this series to me, so I’m looking forward to reading it.

Somershill Manor – S.D. Sykes

Start

Oh look! Another historical mystery series! A huge departure from the ones above, though. It’s set way earlier – 1300s – and with a much different protagonist – a monk turned Lord of the Manor. There’s also an added quirk is that the Plague has ravaged the land, so that’s fun. I haven’t read much in this time period, so I’m not sure how “true to life” it is – and I’m not sure I really care. I don’t read fiction as truth.

Krewe of Hunters – Heather Graham

Finish

Another series of over 30 books, of which I have read around 10. I don’t know why I love these books, but I sure do – paranormal mystery solving with romance? I’m in. I’m also curious as to how she finds all the people who fall in love.

First Colony – Ken Lozito

Start

Another deep love of mine is science fiction set in spaceships. Ever since I was a kid, I have loved to read about people voyaging across the stars and I’ve always been bummed that there aren’t that many in this genre, and those that are often poorly written. YA has some good ones, but adult fiction is lacking. This has been changing, and I’m hoping this one is one that I can start recommending.

Hell Divers – Nicholas Sansbury Smith

Finish

This is a wild ride, y’all. Seriously, this series is all over the place and I don’t even know how to explain it. It’s a dystopian military-ish found family, and there are cannibals. I’ve listened to 7 of the 9 currently published, with the 8th & 9th waiting for me in Audible. I won’t lie – part of the draw is that R.C. Bray is the narrator. I love R.C. Bray.

Ten Horror Books I Can’t Wait to Read

Ten Horror Books I Can’t Wait to Read

It’s Top Ten Tuesday time again! This week is a freebie, so I picked the horror novels that I can’t wait to read. To be honest, some of these have been on my TBR pile for quite awhile but I’m still excited to read them when I get around to it.

The House Across the Lake – Riley Sager

Armed with a pair of binoculars and several bottles of liquor, she passes the time watching Tom and Katherine Royce, the glamorous couple who live in the house across the lake. (from Goodreads)

I love Riley Sager books – they’re always a good time. The House Across the Lake sounds like the most horrible conclusion to the very human inclination to watch the neighbors. It would never normally go to such extremes – but if you’ve never gossiped about the comings and goings of Betty Sue from down the street, I don’t believe you.

Survive the Night – Riley Sager

Behind the wheel is Josh Baxter, a stranger Charlie met by the college ride share board, who also has a good reason for leaving university in the middle of term. – from Goodreads

Serial killer road trip anyone? Another Riley Sager to add to the list of books I definitely can’t wait to read. I’m not sure that a serial killer would sign up for a ride share to get out of town, but I’ll reserve judgement.

The Ghost Tree – Christina Henry

When people go missing in the sleepy town of Smith’s Hollow, the only clue to their fate comes when a teenager starts having terrifying visions. – from Goodreads

This sounds like a good paranormal romp – the main character’s father was found without his heart and then a couple of girls go missing a year later. She starts having visions of a monster, and according to a review, there are “witchy powers” involved along with a standard-issue creepy horror child. I’m already a fan.

These Fleeting Shadows – Kate Alice Marshall

Helen Vaughan doesn’t know why she and her mother left their ancestral home at Harrowstone Hall, called Harrow, or why they haven’t spoken to their extended family since. – from Goodreads

I’m a huge fan of “inheritance from estranged family”, atmospheric novels with a dose of haunted house vibes so this one seems like it must be right up my alley. Add the fact that the house has haunted the girl’s dreams for years and I’m hooked.

Just Like Home – Sarah Gailey

In spite of their long estrangement, in spite of the memories — she’s come back to the home of a serial killer. Back to face the love she had for her father and the bodies he buried there. – from Goodreads

Another estranged family, this time a reunion and not an inheritance, with the added quirk of a serial killer dad. She’s come back to see her mom, who’s dying, and to make some kind of peace with the past. A review used all the best words to describe it (eerie, bizarre, claustrophobic) and promised a big twist in the third act.

The Sanatorium – Sarah Pearce

Half hidden by forest and overshadowed by threatening peaks, Le Sommet has always been a sinister place. Long plagued by troubling rumors, the former abandoned sanatorium has since been renovated into a five-star minimalist hotel. – from Goodreads

I’m almost positive that I’ve put this book on several lists over the years, but have somehow never picked it up. Every time I read the description I’m reminded that I really am interested in it and can’t wait to read it, but then it slips off my radar again. One day, book, one day.

The Room in the Attic – Louise Douglas

A child who does not know her name… Two motherless boys banished to boarding school… Cries and calls from the past that can no longer be ignored… – from Goodreads

Two timelines mix in this one – a tragic story of a little girl staying in an asylum the first bit of the 1900s and then much later when that asylum had been turned into what sounds like a very depressing boarding school. A story full of ghosts, motherless children, and gothic atmosphere. I feel like it shouldn’t be missed.

Hide – Kiersten White

The challenge: spend a week hiding in an abandoned amusement park and don’t get caught.

The prize: enough money to change everything. – from Goodreads

Is there anything much creepier than an abandoned theme park? Is there any scarier game than hide and seek on a large scale? The answer to both is yes, but together, I think they could be an excellent set up for a particularly creepy story. Especially since one of the words used to describe it is “supernatural”.

The Big Dark Sky – Dean Koontz

A group of strangers bound by terrifying synchronicity becomes humankind’s hope of survival in an exhilarating, twist-filled novel by Dean Koontz. – from Goodreads

Dean Koontz is a masterful storyteller. I’ve read so many of his books, it’s a no brainer to read this one as well. It’s a fresh release, only a few months old, and I just found out about it as I was looking up books for this list. Shane is also a huge Dean Koontz fan, so it’s very probable this will end up in our library one way or another.

The Overnight Guest – Heather Gudenkauf

As the storm worsens, Wylie finds herself trapped inside the house, haunted by the secrets contained within its walls—haunted by secrets of her own. Then she discovers a small child in the snow just outside. – from Goodreads

Another creepy kid book! I think everyone who dreams of being a writer wants to retreat to an isolated farmhouse/seaside cottage in order to focus on writing, but this book might put you off on doing that – in winter, anyway.

There they are – 10 horror novels I can’t wait to read. I have no doubt that I’m going to enjoy each and every one of them. Luckily, I read horror all year long, so it won’t have to wait for a year to read these.

-S

10 Witchy Books to Read This Month

It’s spooky season, which means it’s time to read all the spooky books. I don’t have much time to read this month (yay new job & also a horror movie challenge that was not thought through enough), but if I *did*, these are the witchy books I’d read this month.


Payback’s a Witch – Lana Harper

I’m about halfway through this book, and while it’s not what I’d normally pick up, I’m very much enjoying it. The feeling of returning to a place you don’t feel like you belong, the idea that people from back in middle/high school are fully fleshed out adults now – I relate to that. The witchy elements are really fun and the rivalry is enjoyable. It’s definitely trending to be one of my favorite books of 2022, but I’ll reserve judgement until the end.

The Witch of Willow Hall – Hester Fox

I love historical fiction, especially if it’s gothic, and this one promises to be that – set in the 1800s in Mass. One of the reviews says it has an “underlining of menace” and you can sign me up for that. It seems to be more of a subtle witch vibe than the previous book, so I think it’s more in line with what I would normally read.

The Mercies – Kiran Millwood Hargrave

Speaking of historical fiction – this one goes way further back to the 1600s in Norway. I have read very few books set in Norway, much less that take place in that century, so that’s enough to add it to my TBR list. I guess you could say it’s not a witchy book, it’s a witch trial book, but I’m going to count it, since witch trials are very much a part of the history of witches.

The Once and Future Witches – Alix E. Harrow

I’m on the fence about this one – it’s set in the late 1800s and seems to focus on women’s suffrage which normally I’d be all over, but the alliterative names feel over the top cutesy. The reviews are great though, and I do like that it’s a feminist-focused story. And there’s actual witchcraft in it. Let me know if you ever read it!

The Very Secret Society of Irregular Witches – Sangu Mandanna

This has so many elements of a story that I’ll love. There’s an absent archaeologist, a prickly librarian, children being placed into the care of what is basically a governess. And witches, obviously. Add a little romance, I’m sold.

The Ex Hex – Erin Sterling

This one is set in Georgia, and is another romance. I didn’t set out to build a list of witchy romances, but there are apparently a ton of them. There’s a talking cat, too, so you know I added it to Mount TBR. I honestly just really enjoy the idea of putting a hex on your ex and then having to help undo it. It seems like there’s a lot of room for interesting writing there.

The Raven Spell – Luanne G. Smith

I just want to put the first line of the description from Goodreads below, because it truly encapsulates why I want to read this one.

In Victorian England a witch and a detective are on the hunt for a serial killer in an enthralling novel of magic and murder.

This Poison Heart – Kalynn Bayron

I love the idea of a witch who manipulates plants/nature, and I also love surprise inheritances that lead to the main character moving into a haunted and/or ruined estate. This has both. And a centuries-old curse. It’s apparently a retelling, but I’m not sure of what from the description. I would have to guess Greek myths, though.

The Last of the Moon Girls – Barbara Davis

Another mystery/thriller/magical/romance novel. Another “I left home never to return, but then someone died and here I am again, oh and there’s a cute boy” so, yeah, I did add it to the TBR. There’s a murder mystery – though why she didn’t want to solve it while her grandmother was alive and suffering from the town’s gossip I have no idea. I guess we’ll be told eventually.

The Change – Kirsten Miller

As I reach my mid-30s, I am more and more interested in protagonists that are my age or older. And this has 3 menopausal aged women learning that they’re witches and also they try to (do?) solve a murder. A few of the reviews said it was too heavy on the man-hating, which can be kind of a downer, but depending on the story and how their individual backgrounds play into it, a feminist revenge fantasy can be fun.


So there you have it – 9 witchy books I have not read, and 1 I’m currently reading that seem like good Halloween/October reads.

If you pick any of these up, let me know! I would love to get some thoughts on them.

A note – I realized that I didn’t specify when the romances were queer. A few on here are, so in the interests of those who are looking specifically for an LGBTQ+ book: Payback’s a Witch, The Mercies, This Poison Heart, and The Once and Future Witches are tagged as queer/LGBT in Goodreads. Payback I know has several bi characters and the main relationship is f/f.

-S

Three Favorite Bookstores and Six Bookstores I’d Love to Visit

Three Favorite Bookstores and Six Bookstores I’d Love to Visit

It’s Top Ten Tuesday time! The prompt was “Favorite Bookstores OR Bookstores I’d Love to Visit”. So I did both. I wanted to give a shoutout to my all time favorite store (E. Shaver’s), but don’t have 10 favorite bookstores, so I combined both parts of the prompt.

Favorite Bookstores:

  1. E. Shaver’s Booksellers – Savannah, GA
    1. This is hands down my favorite bookstore. It’s quirky and unique while being organized and calm. It’s in an old 19th century building that used to be someone’s house. So the rooms are disjointed and it feels like you’re in a delightful maze made entirely out of books. They have a large selection of book clubs to join if you’re looking to meet people. Also, there are bookstore cats. I’m partial to Skimbleshanks, but the other 3 are also top shelf cats. If you ever find yourself in downtown Savannah, you should visit E. Shaver’s.
  2. Mr. K’s Used Books – Greenville, SC
    1. I think this one makes the list because I lived near it when I lived in Greenville and they were the recipients of many of my used books. They give credit for your used books and that was a lifesaver for me.
  3. Powell’s – Portland, OR
    1. I mean, who doesn’t love to get lost in Powell’s? It’s famous for a reason.

Three Local-ish Bookstores I want to go to:

  1. Posman Books – Atlanta, GA
    1. It’s one in a chain, but everything I’ve read about this makes it sound like a must-see bookstore. I might try to fit in a visit during our next trip to Atlanta.
  2. The Book Lady – Savannah, GA
    1. The Book Lady seems like a throwback a little bit, like a classic bookstore from back in the day. Cozy, you might say. They also have a large collection of antique books, which I adore. I don’t know how I haven’t made it over to Liberty Street yet.
  3. Itinerant Literate Books – Charleston, SC
    1. This place looks like it has the quirky vibe I’m looking for in a place to visit. They have a “boozy book fair” and a book club called Crimes & Crafts. I enjoy independent bookstores and this one seems to be progressive, charming, and everything you could want from one.

Three Bookstores I want to go to:

  1. Boekhandel Dominicanen, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    1. It’s a bookstore in an old medieval church. They have a 3D tour you can take as well, but I really want to go and just see it. It looks amazing and there’s a coffeeshop inside as well, so after a long morning of sightseeing, I could pop in for a coffee and browse the stacks. I wonder if it still has that old church feeling along side the indie bookstore vibe. I love interesting architecture, so this is a no-brainer for me.
  2. Books & Books Key West, Key West, Florida
    1. Judy Blume founded this location of Books & Books and I must go pay my respects. It’s a cute bookstore with lots of events to check out, but I mostly want to go for the Judy Blume piece of it.
  3. Blackwell’s – Oxford, UK
    1. Specifically the shop on Broad Street in Oxford – it’s been in operation since 1879 and looks like an amazing collection of books. There are a lot of Blackwell’s around, but as a history nerd, I really want to see where it all began.

So that’s it – 3 of my favorite bookstores and 6 I hope to visit some day. I want to visit The Netherlands for a whole bunch of reasons, so maybe I can swing by the Boekhandel Dominicanen if I ever make it over.

-S

22 Books I Want to Read in 22

The final 22 list of the year – 22 Books I Want to Read. I have the worst track record with making a TBR pile, but I will always hold out hope that I’ll complete one. And I’ve already read one of them, so that’s a great sign!

Top 5 Reads in 2021

Top 5 Reads in 2021

I read a lot of filler in 2021, but I also read a few of what have become my favorite books of all time. I don’t like reading long book reviews – they seem to give too much away. So here are my top 5 reads of 2021 reviewed in 5 sentences (or less).

The Midnight Library by Matt Haig

This is my favorite book of all time, hands down. I never really bought into the idea that a book could change my life, it always felt too simplistic, but this novel honestly did. My entire way of thinking has been undergoing a change since I read it, and I fully intend on reading it again this year.

Devolution: A Firsthand Account of the Rainier Sasquatch Massacre by Max Brooks

This book did not change my entire way of thinking, but it did get 5 stars from me. I think it’s my favorite cryptid-focus book of all time – it’s truly gripping and I was on the edge of my seat for much of it. I don’t understand how Max Brooks makes everything feel so real, but he did the same in World War Z, so I guess I shouldn’t have been surprised. If you’re into Bigfoot, cryptids in general, or just a good horror story, this is quite probably something you’d enjoy. Now I want to read this again as well.

The Night Sister by Jennifer McMahon

Apparently I was really into hotel-based horror novels, because this and the next book on the list are exactly that. I will say that it’s more atmospherically creepy and not outright horrifying, but the setting is so on point I couldn’t leave it out. I absolutely love suspenseful mysteries, so this is right up my alley. Family secrets, lies, death, mysteries, and a creepy hotel? Count me in.

The Sun Down Motel by Simone St. James

Hotel horror part 2 – this time with the addition of paranormal shenanigans. Strangely, this novel also deals with a missing aunt, so it’s not surprising I get them confused periodically. Simone St. James is one of my favorite authors *of all time* – I’ve read every one of her books and have the next one on pre-order – so I was never not going to read this and I’m thrilled that it lived up to my expectations. She writes some of the best creepy, atmospheric, romantic ghost stories I’ve gotten my hands on. Excellent Halloween read for later in the year if you’re looking for one.

A Lady’s Guide to Mischief and Mayhem (A Lady’s Guide #1) by Manda Collins

This is just a super cute, fun, historical romance/mystery that I really enjoyed, and I’ve been looking forward to reading the second one in the series. Is it a completely historically accurate portrayal? Probably not. Do I care? No.

22 Things in 2022

22 Things in 2022

I’m jumping on the “22 in 22” trend!

I’m excited to get things accomplished in 2022 – I’ve been really stuck in a rut and even with the never-ending pandemic, I’m ready for a HUGE change.

The List

  1. Read 52 books this year.
  2. Listen to 26 audiobooks (included in the above).
  3. Read 13 physical books (also included in the 52).
  4. Read 12 non-fiction books.
    1. Including 4 pro-dev
  5. Celebrate my 35th birthday.
  6. Celebrate our 5th wedding anniversary.
  7. Celebrate the holidays the way they I feel like they should be:
    1. Valentine’s Day
    2. July 4th
    3. Thanksgiving
    4. Christmas
    5. NYE/NYD
  8. Finish my crochet blanket.
  9. Finish Jon & Dad’s blankets.
  10. Start/Finish 2 new crochet projects.
  11. Complete 6 non-crochet craft projects.
  12. Cook a new recipe at least once a month.
  13. Keep Coffee & Crows going all year.
  14. Journal at least once a month.
  15. Write a book.
  16. Get a tattoo.
  17. Lose roughly 40 pounds.
  18. Complete physical therapy.
  19. Thrive at my new job.
  20. Be a better wife.
  21. Be a better daughter/sister.

I’ll be back at the end of the month to check in on this list (and all the others). I know it seems like a lot, with all 4 lists, but the other 3 aren’t really my 2022 goals. They’re more 2022 wish lists – things I want to do/accomplish but won’t be upset if I don’t get around to them. I’ll still check in on them, though.

My Fall Reading List

My Fall Reading List

This fall, I’m sticking with a “to-be-read” list of 5. Ten books seems like too many books for this year. Well, books that aren’t historical romances from Kindle Unlimited, anyway.

Sun Down Motel by Simone St. James

I’ve read every other book by Simone St. James, and I can’t believe it’s taken me this long to read Sun Down Motel. I actually started it in bed last night and was torn between being creeped out and telling myself “one more chapter”. I expect this to be another excellent entry by one of my favorite authors. A creepy read perfect for Spooky Season.

Omens by Kelley Armstrong

One of my favorite series is Kelley Armstrong’s Rockton series. A lot of her other books don’t seem like books I’d enjoy, but I do love her writing, so I’m going to try out this Cainsville series. Maybe it’ll be a stepping stone to some of her other works. A gateway series, if you will. The description also sounds like a perfect Halloween read.

Old Bones by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child

I used to love Preston & Child books, but their Pendergast books lost me after awhile and my interest in their books (together & individually) kind of waned. BUT a lady archaeologist investigating the Donner Party? By authors I know can write super books? Yes, please. Sign me up.

Bellevue by David Oshinsky

I love history, medical/scientific history in particular, and I think this book is going to be so fascinating. The hospital has been around since the mid-1700s, so there can’t be a shortage of awesome, interesting stories. I really can’t wait to dig into it.

Good Morning, Monster by Catherine Gildiner

The workings of the human mind amaze me. I really love anything that breaks down what goes on in people’s minds, especially by people who are trained in psychology. I’ve read some reviews saying that it’s a pretty dark book at times, but overall has a hopeful message, so I’m looking forward to learning about these stories.

So that’s them – five books I’m really looking forward to this fall. I’ve been reading a lot of simple, easy, historical romances and while I’m still going to do that a good bit, it’ll be really nice to have a change of pace.

Reading Through A List of Authors My Mom Left Behind

The day my mom passed, I was standing in my parents’ kitchen aimlessly looking around. Under a magnet on their secondary freezer, I saw a couple sheets of notepad paper entitled “Grocery Author List”. I snuck it into my pocket as if my dad wouldn’t have let me have it if I had asked. I didn’t have a plan for it, I really just wanted her handwriting.

When I got home, I tucked it into the back of the little notebook I record all the books I’ve read (well, the past 2 years worth). I didn’t really forget about it, but also didn’t think about it much. At some point (I’ll have to check my twitter), I declared I would read through the list and I did indeed read a book or 2, but didn’t go further than that. I’ve thought about it off and on the past few months and decided to go for it.

Recently, I went through the author list and added the first books of series (or a stand alone if there wasn’t a series) for each author. I made a Goodreads list specifically for this little side project of mine, which topped out at 50 books. I did leave/add a couple of books that I’ve already read, since technically the authors are on the list. The authors write one of 3 genres: cozy mysteries (most with puns for titles), non-cozy mysteries, and fantasy. Luckily, I enjoy all of those genres, to varying degrees. I also have a soft spot for puns, so I’m not mad that a number of them are named things like “Thyme for Death” and “Lye in Wait” (both are actual titles on the list).

I’m a little concerned that I won’t be able to find a lot of the books, since a lot are from the 90s/early 00s and most don’t seem like they were best sellers. I haven’t checked the library yet, so hopefully several will appear there. I can think of a few that I know they have, though, so that’s promising.

Is this a weird thing to do? I’m going to do it anyway, but I do wonder about that a bit.

Read: 2/50

~Sarah